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Email: drsusan@drsusan.com

Giving Back

Mission on the map

It wasn’t until I was in my 40’s that I learned about the horrific problem of obstetric fistulas in Africa and other developing countries. As an obstetrician, it’s something that we truly NEVER see in the USA. In Africa, young women often get pregnant when their bodies are barely developed, and malnutrition adds to their small stature.

Frequently, the baby is too big to come out and labor will go on for days or even weeks. Eventually the baby dies and the head collapses allowing it to pass, but the days of pressure on the bladder often causes a hole to form in the bladder so the young mother has a chronic flow of urine after delivery.

We are partnered with Child Legacy International

If undergoing female genital mutilation as a young girl, followed by early marriage and loss of a child isn’t bad enough, now she is often ostracized due to the smell and is no longer able to support herself.

As soon as I learned about this, I felt like I had to do something. That led to my relationship with organizations in Sierra Leone and Malawi, two of the poorest countries in the world, and my commitment to help end this horrific and completely preventable problem.

While repairing fistulas is so important, I often felt like an army surgeon, fixing holes in young people who were sent back out into the field to get another one. The MOST important intervention is prevention, by teaching women, midwives and other medical professionals about birth control as well as fistula prevention and the importance of coming to a hospital that can perform a C-section if labor does not progress.

I am also passionate about raising awareness about female genital mutilation and putting an end to this barbaric procedure that cripples women, and making child marriage illegal and culturally unacceptable.

My other focuses are on birth control, allowing women to delay childbearing until they are adults and to limit their family size if they wish, as well as on cervical cancer prevention and education.

Though one person can only do so much, I am committed to raising money to support women’s health projects in rural Africa. Along with my husband, I started a business to help women both in the developing world and right here at home. Through AGIL wellness and the AGIL foundation (named after our girls Abby, Grace, Isabel and Lily who are so fortunate not to have to suffer this way,) we can enjoy world-class wellness and antiaging products and contribute to women less fortunate at the same time. Please join my family of women caring for women worldwide who were not fortunate enough to be born in the developed world, and show them that we care and they are not forgotten.

Sierra Leone and Malawi in Africa

Results

Child Legacy Community Hospital Fact Sheet

05 November 2019

Hospital Size: Over 60,000 ft2

– includes Research, Innovation, and Education Center (aka REDIN Center)
– note: photo “map” of hospital w/ building labels & footage is WIP

Operating Cost Average: $84,000/mo ($1M per year)

– note: “at-a-glance” table of expenses is WIP

Over 100 Full-Time Employees

– 6 Medical Senior Management (1 PhD/MBA; 1 Physician; 2 Nurses; 2 Clinicians)
– 6 Clinical Officers
– 21 Nurse Midwives (includes 2 FT from MoH)
– 27 Patient Attendants, 8 Health Surveillance Assistants (Community/Public Health; all from MoH)
– 6 Laboratory Technicians (includes 3 HIV Diagnostic Assistants)
– 6 Research & Knowledge Management
– 2 Ambulance Drivers
– 18 Hospital Attendants
– 2 Cooks

About 30 “Part-Time”/Locum Contractors

– primarily nurses to fill deficits in schedule

PATIENT VOLUME TOTALS

CATEGORY 2019 AVG
Monthly
Total #
To date
NOTES
Integrated Patient Volume5,560365,000+total # of patients seen in all services/depts
OPD/Clinic Volume: 5+ (est. 2012)1,513175,500+Visits for illness, injury, etc (non-MNCH and EHP services)
OPD/Clinic Volume: under-573778,500+Ages older than 5 not specified for MoH; estimated 40%
MNCH Patient Volume (est. 2015)1,21553,000+of patients who receive Family Planning, Antenatal,
Maternity, L&D, & Postnatal care

PATIENT VOLUME BY SERVICE

CATEGORY 2019 AVG
Monthly
Total #
To date
NOTES
Integrated Patient Volume5,560365,000+total # of patients seen in all services/depts
OPD/Clinic Volume: 5+ (est. 2012)1,513175,500+Visits for illness, injury, etc (non-MNCH and EHP services)
OPD/Clinic Volume: under-573778,500+Ages older than 5 not specified for MoH; estimated 40%
MNCH Patient Volume (est. 2015)1,21553,000+of patients who receive Family Planning, Antenatal,
Maternity, L&D, & Postnatal care

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